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Prioritise Kids Voting and automatic voter registration

Prioritise Kids Voting and automatic voter registration

The Opportunities Party concept for an evidence-based policy-making party, operating from the cross benches is genius. But the example of the Green Party—45 years to be stuck at less than 11% of the vote, despite a proportional electoral system—is instructive. Declining voter turnout, whereby non-voting worldwide has become intergenerational and older voters are much better represented than those younger, strongly favours status quo politics. It is in the Opportunities Party’s self-interest, and that of democracy generally, to prioritise the evidence-based Kids Voting programme, which despite totally out-performing interventions aimed at adults, is only available to fewer than 4.3% of year-7–15 pupils in Aotearoa. The democracy-obsessed Mahurangi Magazine’s complete suite of voter turnout: Year-7–15 voting as curtain-raiser Universal year-7–15 voting in schools Concurrent elections, which will quickly recoup the costs of 1–2, and pay for 4–8 Pre-enfranchised voting Pre-enfranchisement enrolment Lowering the age of enfranchisement Sunday-ising election day Online voting http://www.mahurangi.org.nz/2016/10/19/kids-voting-curtain-raiser/

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    • Gene Dalefield
      tagged this with important 2016-11-30 16:31:55 +1300
    • Tim O'Donnell
      commented 2016-11-27 21:16:10 +1300
      Auto registration is possibly good. Still disagree with under 18yo voting. I also think a 4year term for Goverment would be better than 3.
    • Cimino Cole
      commented 2016-11-27 11:48:39 +1300
      Well said Graeme. While I would support younger-than 16-year-olds voting, there’s an alternative available, and one that would make the exact age of enfranchisement less critical. This is where pre-enfranchised pupils, from Year 7, get to vote in the actual elections, have their votes published but not included in a candidate’s active tally—or the party’s, in the case of general elections. Although pre-enfranchised voters would not directly affect electoral outcomes, they would surely influence candidates and parties mindful of the next election.
    • Graeme Kiyoto-Ward
      commented 2016-11-27 08:15:41 +1300
      16 is reasonable. Actually, at 16 people can leave home, get married, consent to sex, drive a car and, get this if you want justification, get a firearms licence. A 16 year old can potentially own a high powered rifle but can’t tick a box? Really? There’s no reason it should be 18. None at all. This policy has appeal as its quite a newsworthy item and would generate a lot of discussion especially amongst the younger generation. It’s a simple policy and justifiable. Personally, my view is that if you can be seen to be in control of your own decision making enough to be charged with criminal offences, you’re damn well old enough to vote. Make it 14 and get a decent shot of media coverage out of it. For centuries there have been various attempts to minimise the franchise to limit voting (property restrictions, gender, race, onerous ID requirements). Let NZ lead the way in expanding our democracy. We were first to give women the vote. Let’s aim for widest franchise. The best part is that it provides ammo for taking down major parties and confronting them head on. Their only argument would be that it’s unfair on them and mainly that’s because they don’t listen to youth. If you are going to war, choose your battlefields and this is a good one. Has my support for a top 7.
    • Cimino Cole
      commented 2016-11-27 06:57:18 +1300
      No Tim, I am certainly not. This evidence-based policy suggestion is for the age of enfranchisement to be lowered, so the average age of a first-time voter is 18. Without a fixed election date, but with a 3-year term, a New Zealander can be 21 before getting an opportunity to vote. The evidence is that the older a person is before gaining their first opportunity to vote, the lower the probability that they will do so. In the interests of equity, and in not scaring the horses, the age of enfranchisement could be lowered immediately to 17, and subsequently to 16. Kids Voting, meantime, is an evidence-based programme in which culminates in pupils getting to vote—for the same candidates as in the general and body elections, in non-binding, parallel elections. The problem with Kids Voting in Aotearoa is that only a fraction of pupils have the opportunity of participating.
    • Tim O'Donnell
      commented 2016-11-26 21:08:42 +1300
      If you’re suggesting kids get to vote I completely disagree. It would be the same as if the parent had an extra vote. Most kids follow their parents which would essentially get the same result as you’ve already said was undemocratic
    • Tim O'Donnell
      tagged this with dislike 2016-11-26 21:08:42 +1300
    • Alan Barraclough
      commented 2016-11-26 17:28:53 +1300
      I dont fully understand the post but i completely agree with the thrust of this suggestion
    • Alan Barraclough
      tagged this with essential 2016-11-26 17:28:53 +1300
    • Graeme Kiyoto-Ward
      commented 2016-11-26 14:16:16 +1300
      Not in the least.
    • Cimino Cole
      commented 2016-11-26 14:01:26 +1300
      Cheers Graeme—hope I didn’t sound too snippish!
    • Rohan Light
      tagged this with interesting 2016-11-26 12:36:05 +1300
    • Graeme Kiyoto-Ward
      commented 2016-11-26 11:05:45 +1300
      You are right. It is different. It’s under the general heading of youth engagement and I prefer a youth vote over approptionment.
    • Cimino Cole
      commented 2016-11-26 10:20:59 +1300
      Graeme Kiyoto-Ward appears to be suggesting that this is a repeat of the idea contained in: A Vote for Children. It is not—that idea is that parents be entitled to extra votes, which is entirely undemocratic and rewards breeders and penalises those who are childless, deliberately or otherwise.
    • Graeme Kiyoto-Ward
      commented 2016-11-26 09:04:44 +1300
      I think this is a repeat of another idea put forward but a strong democracy is based on participation and something that encourages youth would help lift the voting participation of younger adults (and make parliament more representative of the overall population) is a good thing. Would need a system that provided meaningful options for youth that didn’t distort the overall vote.
    • Graeme Kiyoto-Ward
      tagged this with interesting 2016-11-26 09:04:44 +1300
    • Cimino Cole
      published this page in Suggestions 2016-11-26 07:26:08 +1300