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Keep it simple, build infrastructure

Keep it simple, build infrastructure

Like typical bean counters, you're obsessing over minutiae and getting carried away with theory. There is no such thing as 'fair". How to give everyone a chance however is to educate and provide employment. Do that by building infrastructure, it has been sorely neglected these last three decades, and obtain full employment that way. Employment = saving = home ownership = food on the table = children well schooled = build more infrastructure. And unleash NZ's mining potential, there are limitless resources being ignored (NZ is essentially made of coal and limestone). Then tax very little, scale government small, only essential services, defence (2% of GDP), health scale away from large hospitals and into day clinics in the suburbs, educate by getting the teachers to stay in the classroom (incentives currently are to get out of the classroom) and make lessons practical, the rest only the essentials, end the Nanny state.

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    • Dave Smith
      tagged this with important 2017-02-26 16:55:00 +1300
    • Dave Smith
      tagged this with good 2017-02-26 16:55:00 +1300
    • Jamie Brahm
      commented 2016-12-09 13:17:22 +1300
      Look at the christchurch rebuild. It’s generated massive stimulus for our economy. But its sunk us, as a govt, much much further into debt. Almost record levels. As far as taxation goes, there is more to the outcome, than a stimulated economy. If that stimulated economy is built on world bank borrowing especially.

      Most estimates put our borrowing limit at 5 years, and that was a few years ago BEFORE the second billion dollar at least earthquake. That’s even shorter than the US’s 5-10 years. And when we reach that point, we are in the same place as greece. The bank will say no, or demand severe austerity leading to depression and bank closures. Greece is the living example, of where over half of the oecd is heading.

      You can’t just keep borrowing, every single financial year, decade on decade, and expect the lender to keep dishing out money.

      borrowing endlessly = inevitable poverty. Regardless of how much that borrowing might temporarily stimulate the economy.

      We need to tighten the strings and invest on safe profit making ventures, before it’s too late. Trouble is I doubt any politician has the guts.
    • James Turnbull
      commented 2016-12-08 18:18:23 +1300
      Ken … no, I’ve spent a big chunk of time here and this is NOT your TYPICAL bean counter at all.

      It’s more like bean counter on angeldust !
    • Jamie Brahm
      commented 2016-12-08 16:38:16 +1300
      I’d also add we are nearly at our government spending limit. Any further borrowing we do should be for investments, things that keep out government budgets afloat long term, reliably. Like the australian super fund. Or our recently sold assets. And this does not reliably generate steady profits for govt.
    • Jamie Brahm
      commented 2016-12-08 16:32:11 +1300
      That does not address taxation dodgers at all. Nor the housing crisis.
    • Jamie Brahm
      tagged this with bad 2016-12-08 16:32:10 +1300
    • Tim O'Donnell
      commented 2016-12-08 06:19:41 +1300
      You need money to do this first. You need a good tax system to get the money
    • Tim O'Donnell
      tagged this with impractical 2016-12-08 06:19:41 +1300
    • Ken Horlor
      published this page in How would you make New Zealand Fair Again? 2016-12-08 03:06:04 +1300