Biodiversity Policy FAQ

Biodiversity Policy FAQ

  • Should Farm Environmental Plans be mandatory or not?

    Answer

    TOP supports making Farm Environmental Planning mandatory to recognise that good biodiversity and environmental management is good for business long-term.

  • Should whitebaiting be allowed?

    Answer

    TOP supports whitebaiting farms. Wild whitebait has a long history in New Zealand, but today we know that it decimates our engaged fauna. Wild-caught whitebait is part of our heritage, but not our future.

  • Should 1080 be banned?

    Answer

    TOP prioritises controlling pests to protect our native flora and fauna. TOP supports technological innovation such as biological control and smart AI trapping that improves outcomes over and above 1080 control. Until this is possible, we must use the best tools we have, and this is currently 1080.

  • Would you increase the money given to wilding conifer control, and how?

    Answer

    Wilding conifer control is important and requires more funding. Investment in solving this problem will best come from the commercial forestry industry, as the ones who benefit the most from exotic tree planting in New Zealand.

  • Would you increase the money given to Kauri dieback management and research, and how?

    Answer

    Yes. TOP wants to see policy that helps Kiwis find really ingenious home-grown solutions to this challenge, such as gene editing to increase beneficial mycorrhizal to combat the disease. This is important for the survival of our own taonga, but has the potential to help New Zealand technology and innovation play a valuable role in similar international challenges.

  • Would you increase funding to DOC?

    Answer

    TOP policy is to increase the money available for conservation in New Zealand by delivering more funding towards private landowners, community groups and iwi, where much of our most vulnerable and underrepresented flora and fauna are located.

  • Where do you stand on the National Policy Statement on Biodiversity?

    Answer

    TOP supports in principle the development of a National Policy Statement on Biodiversity. More decisive action is needed on this work, as it has taken many years to get to this point, and our biodiversity has declined over this time. Current progress is commendable, but TOP pursues further refinement to ensure that the right incentives are in place for those who are doing the right thing. TOP also supports clearer regulatory bottom lines for those who are not.